5 Reasons to go Bangkok | Bangkok Tourism Guide

About Bangkok 

Bangkok is Thailand’s capital and most populated city. As of 2020, 10.539 million people lived in the Chao Phraya River delta city, 15.3% of Thailand’s population. At the 2010 census, over 14 million people (22.2%) lived in the Bangkok Metropolitan Region, making Bangkok Thailand’s largest and most economically significant city.

Bangkok began as a 15th-century Ayutthaya Kingdom trading center that became Thonburi in 1768 and Rattanakosin in 1782. Bangkok led Siam’s late-19th-century modernization under Western pressure. Thailand abolished absolute monarchy, embraced constitutional rule, and experienced multiple coups and upheavals in the 20th century, with the city at the center.

The city, created as a special administrative district under the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration in 1972, grew significantly from the 1960s to the 1980s and currently influences Thailand’s politics, economy, education, media, and modern life.

Many multinationals established regional offices in Bangkok during the 1980s and 1990s Asian investment boom. The city dominates regional finance and business. Its arts, fashion, and entertainment scene has grown alongside its transit and healthcare hubs. Street activity, cultural sites, and red-light areas define the city. The Grand Palace and Buddhist temples like Wat Arun and Wat Pho contrast with Khaosan Road and Patpong nightlife. Bangkok constantly ranks as the world’s most visited city. read also – Grand Canyon: Why Visit?

5 Reasons to go Bangkok
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Bangkok’s chaotic cityscape and poor infrastructure are the result of fast expansion and poor urban planning. Traffic congestion and air pollution in the 1990s were caused by an inadequate road network, an expanded expressway network, and high private car use. The city now has eight urban rail lines and other public transit, yet congestion persists. Climate change-related sea level rise threatens the city.

Bangkok of History

Bangkok was a village on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River under Ayutthaya in the early 15th century. The town grew in importance due to its riverfront location. In 1688, the French were ejected from Siam after a siege at Bangkok, a customs outpost with forts on both banks of the river. After the fall of Ayutthaya to the Burmese in 1767, the newly minted King Taksin established his capital at the town, which formed the base of the Thonburi Kingdom.

King Phutthayotfa Chulalok (Rama I) succeeded Taksin in 1782 and moved the capital to Rattanakosin Island on the eastern river, forming the Rattanakosin Kingdom. Bangkok was founded on April 21, 1782, when the City Pillar was constructed.

First with China, then with Western traders coming in the early-to-mid 19th century, Bangkok’s economy grew. Bangkok, Siam’s capital, modernized under Western pressure in the late 19th century. Kings Mongkut (Rama IV, 1851–68) and Chulalongkorn (Rama V, 1868–1910) introduced the steam engine, printing press, rail transit, utilities, formal education, and healthcare to the city. read also – The Origin Of London

After absolute monarchy was overthrown in 1932, Bangkok became the center of military-political power conflicts.
Bangkok was bombed by the Allies during World War II because Thailand cooperated with Japan, but US aid and government investment helped it grow afterward. Bangkok’s status as a US military R&R destination encouraged tourism and cemented its sex tourism reputation.

Disproportionate urban development increased income inequality and rural migration to Bangkok, which grew from 1.8 million to 3 million in the 1960s.

5 Reasons to go Bangkok
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Following the US withdrawal from Vietnam in 1973, Japanese corporations took over as leaders in investment, and the increase of export-oriented manufacturing led to growth of the financial market in Bangkok. The city grew rapidly until the 1997 Asian financial crisis. By then, several public and social challenges had evolved, among them the strain on infrastructure reflected in the city’s legendary traffic congestion.

Bangkok’s political theater has seen student uprisings in 1973 and 1976, anti-military rallies in 1992, and numerous street protests since 2006, notably those by parties opposing and supporting former prime leader Thaksin Shinawatra from 2006 to 2013 and a resurgent student-led movement in 2020.

King Chulalongkorn established Monthon Krung Thep Phra Maha Nakhon as a national subdivision in 1906, formalizing city administration. In 1915, the monthon was divided into provinces, whose administrative boundaries have subsequently varied. After Phra Nakhon province on the eastern bank of the Chao Phraya merged with Thonburi province on the west the year before, the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) was formed in 1972.

Economy

The economy of Thailand is still the second largest in all of South East Asia, trailing only Indonesia’s, and the World Bank considers Thailand to be “one of the greatest development success stories.” This is despite the fact that Thailand was hit particularly hard by the recent economic crisis that was sweeping through South East Asia. It is a recently industrialised economy that currently sits in the 61st rank on the Index of Economic Freedom for 2013, with a score of 64.1 out of a possible 100 points for economic freedom. Because of this, it is in the upper half of the rankings for all economies.

There are a total of 41 countries that make up the Asia-Pacific area, and Thailand is the nation with the tenth-highest population out of all of them.

The principal engine that propels Thailand’s economy, which is the second largest in South East Asia and accounts for two thirds of the country’s gross domestic product, is the exportation of goods. Thailand is the second largest economy in South East Asia. The economy of Thailand is the second most powerful in all of South East Asia.

The primary pillars of Thailand’s economic success are the country’s thriving manufacturing and service sectors. Despite the fact that the northern region of Thailand is famous for its agricultural output, the agriculture industry in Thailand only contributes for 8.4% of the country’s gross domestic product. The government is making continual efforts to integrate the domestic economy into the global market and increase the efficiency of regulatory frameworks. One of the goals of these efforts is to improve the effectiveness of regulatory frameworks.

In addition, the purpose of these activities is to improve the effectiveness of the regulatory frameworks that are in place. Both the World Trade Organization and the Free Trade Area of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are open to Thailand’s participation as a member nation. Both of these organisations work to promote free trade in the different regions that they serve (AFTA).

5 Reasons to go Bangkok
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One reason for Thailand’s success is because the country’s trade is not strictly regulated, which is one of the factors that has contributed to the country’s prosperity. Read also – norovirus michigan

The unemployment rate in Thailand is approximately 0.7%, making it one of the lowest rates in the country and one of the lowest rates in the world. This places Thailand among the countries with one of the lowest rates of unemployment. The policy interest rate, which is sometimes referred to as the benchmark interest rate, is currently at 2.75 percent, while inflation is currently hovering between around 3 percent.

Even though it is against the law in Thailand to engage in prostitution, tourism is the single most important contributor to the economy of the country. This includes the flourishing sexual services business that can be found across the nation.

Education

Since the beginning of the city’s history, Bangkok has always been Thailand’s preeminent centre for academic institutions of higher learning. This city is responsible for the construction of the first schools in the country, which took place in the latter half of the 19th century; as of today, there are 1,351 schools located in the city. The city is home to all five of the nation’s oldest universities, which were all founded between 1917 and 1943.

All of these universities may be found in this city. Chulalongkorn, Thammasat, Kasetsart, Mahidol, and Silpakorn are the names of these educational establishments. Since that time, the city has continued to hold its dominant position, particularly in the sector of higher education. The city of Bangkok and the surrounding Metropolitan Region are home to the vast majority of the country’s educational institutions, both state and private universities.

Chulalongkorn and Mahidol are the only universities in Thailand to have made it into the top 500 of the QS World University Rankings. Both of these universities are located in Bangkok. The city of Bangkok is home to both of these educational institutions. The King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, which can be found in the same city as Bangkok, is the only university in Thailand to have made it into the top 400 of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for 2012–2013. These rankings were released earlier this year.

Over the course of the past few decades, there has been an increase in the demand for higher education in Thailand. As a direct result of this demand, brand-new educational institutions have sprung up in the country and have been designed to cater specifically to the needs of Thai students. Not only have individuals relocated to Bangkok from outlying parts of Thailand and other nations in pursuit of economic opportunities, but also for the opportunity to get a degree from one of the city’s many colleges.

Bangkok is home to a large number of educational institutions. Ramkhamhaeng University was Thailand’s first open university when it was founded in 1971, and it currently has the highest student enrollment of any institution in the kingdom.

The demand for additional people to have access to higher education has led to the development of a huge number of additional universities and colleges, both public and private. These institutions can now accommodate more students. The Greater Bangkok region continues to be home to the vast majority of institutions, and the city’s tertiary education scene continues to be overpopulated with individuals who are not originally from Bangkok.

This is despite the fact that additional colleges have been created in crucial regions. However, the issue is not exclusive to the field of higher education as a whole. Around sixty to seventy percent of students from other parts of Thailand who were enrolled in secondary education went to Bangkok during the 1960s. These students ranged in age from ten to nineteen. This was due to a number of circumstances, one of which was a lack of secondary schools in the provinces, as well as a view that the educational standards were greater in the nation’s capital.

Even though this difference has, for the most part, been eradicated since then, tens of thousands of students are still competing for admission to Bangkok’s most prestigious schools. This has occurred despite the fact that the disparity has mostly been eliminated since then. Education has been a main factor for a substantial amount of time in Bangkok’s centralization, and it will be an essential component in the efforts that the government makes to decentralise the country.

Cultural 

If you have ever gone to Bangkok and observed that it is a somewhat crowded and diverse location, then you would have good reason to think that way about the city.It is estimated that there are currently 10–11 million people living in the Thai capital, which is a number that is significantly more than the population that was there in 1950, which was less than 1.5 million people.

You can see from those numbers how much the population of Bangkok has grown during the latter half of the 20th century and onward, and there does not appear tYou would have good reason to think that way about Bangkok if you had ever been there and noticed that it is a location that is both quite congested and diversified. If you have ever been to Bangkok, you would have good reason to think that way about the city.

It is believed that there are approximately 10–11 million people living in the capital of Thailand, which is a number that is much more than the population that was there in 1950, which was less than 1.5 million people. In 1950, there were less than 1.5 million people living in the city. You can tell from those data how much Bangkok’s population has risen since the latter half of the 20th century and even after that, and there does not appear to be any hint that this increase will slow down any time in the near future.

As we will see in a moment, the people you meet in Bangkok who might be considered in a general sense to be Thais are vastly different from one another in a number of significant respects. These differences can be seen in a variety of aspects, including their language, their religion, and their culture. read also – 10 golden gate bridge view point

The vast majority of people who live in the city are of Thai ethnicity; nevertheless, more than a quarter of them are migrants from other parts of Thailand as well as from other parts of the country. This is the reason why the chaotic metropolis that serves as Thailand’s capital is home to such a broad spectrum of tastes, sights, and sounds. It is because of its location in the heart of the country. As can be seen from the city’s defining qualities, the population of Bangkok is comprised of a varied range of people that hail from various regions across the nation. This is evidenced by the city’s demographics.

5 Reasons to go Bangkok
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They are also highly impacted by the younger generations in the country as well as the decreasing share of non-Thais in the population. Both of these demographic shifts are occurring simultaneously. And in relation to the relatively harsh and antiquated immigration laws that have been the bane of many a foreigner in Thailand for aeons, they make it difficult for anyone to just take up residency within the city. This is because they have been the scourge of many a foreigner in Thailand for aeons. Since the beginning of time, these rules have been many foreigners in Thailand’s worst nightmare.

A great number of people who have noble goals and would like to make Thailand their permanent home have attempted, and continue to try, to integrate themselves into the city and the community of Thailand. However, after realising that the odds are stacked against them in a variety of different ways, a large number of these people eventually come to the conclusion that setting down in Thailand is not a good job. This post is for you if you’ve ever wondered about some of the differences you observed between the people of Bangkok when you looked around at them all the time and wondered what those differences meant.

This post is for you if you’ve ever wondered about some of the differences you observed between the people of Bangkok when you looked around at them all the time and wondered what those differences meant. o be any sign of that growth slowing down anytime soon.

As we will see in a moment, the people you meet in Bangkok who might be considered in a general sense to be Thais are vastly different from one another in a number of important respects.
The majority of people living in the city are of Thai ethnicity; however, over a quarter of them are migrants from other parts of Thailand and other parts of the country. This is the reason why the tumultuous metropolis that serves as Thailand’s capital is home to such a diverse range of flavours, sights, and noises.

The demographics of Bangkok’s citizens attest to a diverse group of individuals who have come from different parts of the country, as indicated by the city’s key characteristics. They are also strongly impacted by the country’s younger generations as well as the decreasing percentage of non-Thais in the population. And in relation to the relatively harsh and antiquated immigration laws that have been the scourge of many a foreigner in Thailand for aeons, they make it tough for just about anyone to just take up residency within the city. These laws have been the bane of many a foreigner in Thailand for aeons.

Many people who have good intentions and would like to settle in Thailand have tried, and continue to try, to integrate themselves into the city and Thai society. However, many of these people eventually decide that settling in Thailand is a bad job after realising that the odds are stacked against them in many different ways. This post is for you if you’ve ever puzzled about some of the distinctions you saw between the people in Bangkok when you looked around at them all the time.

This post is for you if you’ve ever puzzled about some of the distinctions you saw between the people in Bangkok when you looked around at them all the time.

 

Bangkok Tourism Guide

Because it is the starting point for excursions to many of Thailand’s stunning islands and beaches, the city of Bangkok is consistently ranked among the most popular tourist destinations in the world. The city of Bangkok, which is the capital of Thailand, is a bustling and exciting site that delivers non-stop action and never ceases to astound tourists with its vast array of sights, sounds, and smells. The city also acts as the country’s largest and most populous city.

It can be overwhelming because it bombards one’s senses with gorgeous temples, delectable cuisine and pungent street food, an energetic nightlife, and thrilling treatments. It is a vibrant and exotic location that offers a wide variety of things to discover, from bustling roads that are lined with food stalls and enormous retail malls to towering skyscrapers that are topped with rooftop bars that provide spectacular views and signature cocktails.

This location offers a wide variety of things to discover, including: This is your illustrated guide to organising the most memorable experiences of your trip, along with insider tips to help you explore the city as it truly is. This is your guide to organising the most memorable experiences of your trip.

BANGKOK HIGHLIGHTS – 5 REASONS TO GO

1. Architecture reminiscent of a fairytale set within majestic temples that are home to some of the largest Buddha images in the world.
2. The rooftop bars that are located at the highest and most stunning locations around the world.
3. A number of the largest outdoor markets anywhere in the globe
4. One of the best cuisines in the world and the most diverse selection of street food.
5. A world-famous nightlife scene that caters to people of all tastes.

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